23
March 2017

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Quality : HD
Title : Rings
Director : F. Javier Gutiérrez.
Writer :
Release : 2017-02-01
Language : English.
Runtime : 117 min.
Genre : Horror.

Synopsis :
Rings is a movie genre Horror, was released in February 1, 2017. F. Javier Gutiérrez was directed this movie and starring by Matilda Anna Ingrid Lutz. This movie tell story about Julia becomes worried about her boyfriend, Holt when he explores the dark urban legend of a mysterious videotape said to kill the watcher seven days after viewing. She sacrifices herself to save her boyfriend and in doing so makes a horrifying discovery: there is a “movie within the movie” that no one has ever seen before.

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spencer

Spencer works in technology, and has been a LARPer in every aspect of the term since 1998. He likes the community most of all, but also really enjoys designing encounters and discussing LARP theory and mechanics. It is his goal to see the hobby grow and get better with every passing year. He lives in Marietta, GA.

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14 Comments

  1. Claus Raasted March 3, 2016 7:59 AM

    Looking forward to reading more on the topic. 😉

    Reply
  2. Almighty Watashi March 3, 2016 8:48 AM

    Sadly, the most popular larps usually have big rulebooks to give players a lot of options and progression with even more options. I see most larp rules being of late ’90s rpg quality. Everyone understands the importance of fun(tm) and balance(tm), but most of big larp rules are still clumsy, bloated, hard to scan/skim and made in such a way that there’s no truly “simple” class because every class still needs to know other classes. Every fighter usually needs to know most magic spells and every wizard needs to know how all the armors and big weapons work. We’ll probably be stuck in this “designed by engineers” mindset for a while because this hobby is still kinda small and not very profitable.

    Reply
  3. Pete Woodworth March 3, 2016 11:16 PM

    “Parry, on the other hand is one of those effects plaguing LARP rules systems that seek to reproduce an action people are able to safely execute themselves. Remember, the goal here is to impede immersion as little as possible, so in effect, you’re telling someone you dodged an attack that you didn’t actually dodge.”

    I can see where you’re coming from here, but at the same time, there is an equally valid argument that limiting players to what they can actually do in real life misses the point of playing heroic, fantastical characters. Of course it’s nice if a player portraying a master warrior can actually fight pretty well too, but what about someone like me – a guy who’s built like a sack of gummi bears and has about the same reflex speed? If I want to play an amazing warrior, shouldn’t the rules be there to support me as much as they do the guy playing a fire-throwing wizard? Or are you going to tell me that in a pretend world full of made up people I’m still limited by my actual physical capabilities, sorry, no heroic warrior for me?

    Reply
  4. Aaron March 4, 2016 12:24 AM

    An interesting article. I wrote about this in 2009, and have learned a lot since, and continue to learn more every day.

    Personally, I agree with Spencer’s sentiment: let’s stress immersion and realism in larps instead of fidelity to D&D or WoW. But that’s my own personal opinion. I also agree with Pete’s comment about being a heroic warrior: If you are not one IRL, mechanics are needed to make you one, like training wheels. Of course, those that game the system will ignore putting character build points in things they are already good at and put them in things they are not. If you are already nimble, skip the dodge skill and get points in something you cannot do, i.e., charm or command or other social skill (or vice versa).

    What Spencer needs to avoid doing is pushing personal preference for a minimal mechanics system and instead advocate a BETTER mechanics system, or a more efficient one. Pete should be able to play a combat-skilled knight if he wishes, but, it should be transparent that NOT ALL LARPS ALLOW HIM TO DO THAT. For example, Rock Band Murder Mystery, a one-shot theater larp I created and ran at Wyrd Con and Intercon, requires participants to be able to see and hear–I wanted to restrict blind or deaf people from participating, but had to adjust my Intercon run in case someone who wasn’t abled in sight and hearing wanted to play. It wasn’t necessary, but I needed to prepare for that. Larps have a very ableist problem.

    Thus, I would suggest that larps state up front that if you are unable to swing a boffer while running, you should not play a character that can. Or, conversely, larps should state that players can be in a wheelchair and still play Conan, because the mechanics will assist them. Neither is right or wrong, they just need to be stated clearly so PCs (Paying Customers) can make informed choices. That’s the real problem, not that larps have elaborate mechanics. Some people love complications. More power to them.

    This problem is also a product of the fantasy genre; go with modern day horror, or drama, or romance, or comedy larps, for example, and mechanics diminish or vanish. This is also my belief of why larps don’t have a bigger audience: not everyone wants to be an elf in a forest for the weekend.

    There are methods to avoid the issue of calls and confusing rules to memorize; it can be done quite easily. I won’t elaborate, because I am using those methods for a larp I am creating, but if you think about it, there are lots of ways to avoid memorizing complex rules. The one hint I will leak is that every player does not need to know all the rules (the GMs do, unfortunately).

    Finally, the word you want, Spencer, is ELICIT, not ILLICIT. Your homophones amuse me, thank you.

    Reply
  5. Pingback: You’re Breaking My Immersion! Or, How To Inadvertently Enable Ableism | Shoshana Kessock

  6. Pete Woodworth March 4, 2016 1:11 AM

    The idea that LARP can have a single set of “best practices” is also a massive assumption, specifically because it implies that all larp is designed to meet the same goals. Not even all boffer larps are, or should be.

    There’s a lot of confusion here between the notion of “I don’t like X” and “X is bad design.” One does not entail the other, except that a game with X is probably one the author would prefer to avoid.

    Reply
  7. Michael Malecki March 4, 2016 3:48 AM

    I really get tired of people holding Europeans up as the gold standard of LARPing. There are plenty of LARPs doing fantastical things in the US and it seems all LARPing.org ever posts is about how great Nordic Larp is.
    Americans have different value systems than Europeans. We look for different things than them for entertainment. We want to feel accomplished, our society rewards competitiveness so we are competitive by nature and to play fair sometime we need rules. There is a need to “win” that is seen more in American LARPs…and it’s not something we’re going to browbeat out of it by claiming Europeans are better.
    As for rules, while it’s true many of these rule books are lengthy, usually you only have the option of a few skills at the start. In Dystopia Rising, people are limited by their profession and only a few points to create their character so I can explain and assist a new player to create the badass zombie killer they want to create in 15 minutes. As the player progresses, they learn the rules over time. However, you just “skinmed” the rules.
    It seems like all we hear about is the “superiority” of rules lite systems and European LARPs. About how we’re not “grown up enough” to appreciate it. You’re entitled to your beliefs, but it seems like you all never have anything good to say about American Larp, and it’s clear that your experience is very regional to the games you play.

    Reply
    • Maria March 13, 2016 1:36 PM

      @Michael Malecki: Enlighten me: Where in the article did Spencer claim that European Larp is “the gold standard”? Where did he mention Nordic Larp? All I can find is this: “We haven’t really seen the growth and improvement in player population and aesthetics experienced by the European LARP scene.” And that’s completely factual.
      1) Larping communities in all European countries have grown in numbers since the late 80s/early 90s, e.g. from German events with a maximum of 200 people in1995 to fest larps with 9000 people in 2013 (imho we have passed the peak but the numbers remain stable)
      2) I you look at any European country with a long-standing larp tradition you will see that aesthetics have improved over the years – garb standards, tents, NPC kit, props…
      3) Can’t really speculate about the “we haven’t” part – I do not know enough about US-American larp to decice if there has or hasn’t been any growth or improvement.

      @ Alrik: Yes, there is a movement away from rule-heavy systems in Germany but that does not mean that all larps worldwide should be DKWDDK – or DKWDK. Generalizing a European trend as the non-plus-ultra for everyone seems… wrong. As Jason pointed out, some people may still prefer rules for various reasons
      * intricacies could be fun (just like board games)
      * predictability of cause-effect
      * leveling (everyone measured by the same standards)
      * making up for things you can neither do for real nor “darstellen” (roleplay) – it a conceptual choice to have spells or supernatural abilities even if players have to imagine their IG effect
      etc.

      Reply
    • Maria March 13, 2016 1:37 PM

      @Michael Malecki: Enlighten me. Where in the article did Spencer claim that European Larp is “the gold standard”? Where did he mention Nordic Larp? All I can find is: “We haven’t really seen the growth and improvement in player population and aesthetics experienced by the European LARP scene.” And that’s completely factual.
      1) Larping communities in all European countries have grown in numbers since the late 80s/early 90s, e.g. from German events with a maximum of 200 people in 1995 to fest larps with 9000 people in 2013 (imho, we have passed the peak but the numbers remain stable)
      2) If you look at any European country with a long-standing larp tradition you will see that aesthetics have improved over the years – garb standards, tents, NPC kit, props…
      3) Can’t really speculate about the “we haven’t” part – I do not know enough about US-American larp to decice if there has or hasn’t been any growth or improvement.

      @ Alrik: Yes, there is a movement away from rule-heavy systems in Germany but that does not mean that all larps worldwide should be DKWDDK – or DKWDK. Generalizing a European trend as the non-plus-ultra for everyone seems… wrong. As Jason pointed out, some people may still prefer rules for various reasons
      * intricacies could be fun (just like board games)
      * predictability of cause-effect
      * leveling (everyone measured by the same standards)
      * making up for things you can neither do for real nor “darstellen” (roleplay) – it a conceptual choice to have spells or supernatural abilities even if players have to imagine their IG effect
      etc.

      Reply
      • alrik March 17, 2016 5:44 AM

        I never demanded (or advised) that every LARP in the world should follow the DKWD(D)K-Philosophy. Much as Spencer never claimed “European Larp” (what ever that is) to be some kind gold standard. 😉 I just wanted to debunk Mr. Maleckis anecdotal and prejudiced claims regarding European LARPs being different from US-Americans because of different cultures or values.
        If that would be the case, we (Germany) would have been a rules light dominated country right from the start. But there was a development in the last decades, as we both explained. For backing this up with some data, I chose the DKWD(D)K occurrence as an example, because it’s the easiest to keep track of (thanks to the Larpkalender features), cause it’s the most common rule light approach and one of the less debatable. (I wanted to avoid the question, if a certain system like Fate or Degenesis counts as rule light or not.) I guess, I have red to many shallow arguments like “They have better costumes, cause they have castles” poisoning the (english) discussions and never get challenged.

        Regarding the assets of rule heavier (?) games you mentioned: That’s certainly enough for another (larperning?) debate. In short, I don’t think that more rules provide us with more predictability of couse and effect (thanks to al the rule layers, munchkins and “creative” organizers) but I do think that there is an equivalent of leveling in DKWD(D)K LARP (->character improvement in terms of gear, status and real live/darstellungs skills).

        I don’t expect there to be a “best practice” of LARP, but I am sure that there is the worst practice: unconsciously copying P&P and board game rules and sticking to that approach no matter what. And that’s (in my opinion) one of the things Spencer criticizes.

        Reply
        • Maria March 26, 2016 3:48 PM

          @Alrik: My apologies, I might have misread your comment as “anti-rules”.

          Regarding the “level-up” factor of DKWDK/DKWDDK – that is actually one of the drawbacks of “no rules” because you now have to depend on OOG-assets to “advance” your character (money, time, craftings skills, socializing) and there are natural limits to how much you can do there.
          Case in point: Magic – even if it is theoretically possible to play really powerful magicians who can cast spells that have a perfect “Darstellung” – they are still limited by how much OOG-theater/SFX-equipment that person is willing to schlep (pyroflasher, smoke device, Led-wearables…).
          Some of the German standards of what counts as an adequate “Darstellung” for those parts of the game that are supernatural/more high-fantasy have become unreasonably high, imho – normative even.

          So, as much as I personally prefer DKWDDK – I can totally see why rule systems are appealing.

          Reply
  8. Alrik March 4, 2016 9:12 AM

    Disclaimer: Please be patient with my bad English.

    What you (Spencer) say about the development of LARP and its early rule systems from the P&P hobby sounds very familiar to me,
    because it was basically the same in the german scene. The first point based system “Dragon Sys” was and still is very rule heavy too.

    But this is not the only remnant from the roots of our hobby.
    There is an older article in the german Larpwiki (“Das Dunkle Erbe” / “The dark heritage”), that talks about the P&P typical premise of playing
    “the heroes” and why this might not be the best approach for LARP: We can be as heroic as we want, all with super special abilities and items,
    as long as we are just four friends at a table with a GM that portrays the whole (not so heroic) rest of the game world.
    But you have at least fifty to a hundred and sometimes even a couple of thousand PCs at an LARP event.
    If they all play mighty heroes, you get in a serious inflation. The average player meets Gandalfs, Aragorns and Drizzt Do Urdens en masse
    and the simple farmers, soldiers and craftsman (played by the few NPCs?) are a rarity. Is a village or even a tavern full of heroes something else than ridiculous? Another problem: The story, the whole world develops around the heroes, its protagonists, at least in P&P, books and movies.
    But how could that work if anybody is „the hero“?
    The authors of the article at least give us the advice to play normal inhabitants of the world rather than classic high-fantasy heroes.
    This part of our dark (cause unrecognised) P&P heritage is important, because it reinforces the rule heavy systems and with them all their problems.
    As Pete Woodworth said: „If I want to play an amazing warrior, shouldn’t the rules be there to support me as much as they do the guy playing a fire-throwing wizard?“

    The differences in the LARPs on both sites of the pond have nothing to do with „different values“ in our cultures.
    German LARPs too began with ugly boffer weapons, heavy rule books and a competitive attitude.
    The current spread of „rule light“ events is a development within the scene in the last decade.
    The search tool of the larpkalender.de gives us some data about this:
    There are 430 event entries for 2002 total, but only 47 of these are „free play“/“You can do what you can do (or represent)“. The later is a game philosophy that is as rule light as you can get. In 2015 on the other hand, this kind of games fill 219 out of 470 event entries. In some states its almost the only played „rule“ style now. (always excluding organizer meetings and workshops from the data)

    You will find similar stories on the pages of our scandinavian neightbours.

    Reply
  9. Jason Mote March 6, 2016 5:17 PM

    This is an interesting read.

    Nordic LARPs are great. They are not the final answer to LARP however. They are a good step forward that will allow North American LARPs the chance to change for the better. Lighter-rules and tighter books are the way things are moving for sure. I would not expect anyone to completely break away from in-game skills however.

    Game complexity exists in many forms. I prefer games that are easy to learn and difficult to maser – Chess or GO – for example. However, even card games such as Magic: the Gathering take many games to learn what the cards do, and they are right there in from of your face. Learning combos and when to play a card is key to playing every game. Mtg can be learned quickly but takes a while to get into the swing and know how to build a deck, etc.

    Take a look at Vampire, Werewolf, and other Mind’s Eye Theater games – these are some of the most complex games out there! Multiple rulebooks, each filled with new powers and abilities. The skills and abilities and combos and synergies are astounding! It takes months of gaming every weekend to really know how to play the game or be any good at combat. This is the largest LARP game in the world – played in every country around the globe.

    Reply
  10. Grimworks August 17, 2016 8:46 AM

    Interesting article and replies. Spencer, is there a way to contact you about LARP we are working on in the Southast? We can be reached at grimworksstudios@gmail.com

    Reply

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